A short post to emphasise once again just how interesting everyday life can be here, for us newbies anyway.

I decided to take a road I hadn’t been on before, which headed generally in the right direction for home, and thought I would share with you what a simple local drive can provide by way of new scenery.

Our first stop was at a hairdresser for a cut. The last one I had was in Phuket and she did an excellent job. However the $200.00 returned flight cost from Chiang Mai to Phuket seemed a bit excessive so I decided to give a local salon the opportunity to set my style for the next few weeks.

Post haircut. Not too bad although I always look better at night!

Post haircut. Not too bad although I always look better at night in low lighting!

The next stop was at this cafe as part of my unsuccessful quest to find a decent local coffee shop. The unbeaten favourite so far is still Biscotti Cafe HERE, but it is a little too far from home to be a drop-in place.

One of many, many local cafes.

One of many, many local cafes.

Unfortunately Baan a Din won’t be replacing Biscotti anytime soon as it was the worst coffee I have had in a long time. The farang owner was asleep I was told by his apologising, very pregnant and sweet wife. This was one of four farang run cafe/bar/restaurants I saw on this road, mostly hole in the wall places maybe catering to the number of big Moo Baans in the area, which would have a few foreign residents.

A pretty plain interior.

A pretty plain interior. Friendly and caring staff. Maybe on another day…….

So unfulfilled on the coffee front we headed off only to be stopped when Gaun got very excited when she spotted this field. We were invited onto the farm after Gaun spoke to one of the workers as he obviously recognised a fellow enthusiast.

Now can you guess what would drive an Isaan woman into a gastronomic frenzy?

Now can you guess what would drive an Isaan woman into a gastronomic frenzy?

The mighty chilli.

The mighty chilli and lots of it.

A photo for Gaun's sister back in Isaan.

A photo for Gaun’s sister back in Isaan.

Well organised. Raised beds with plastic and water channels in-between.

Well organised. Raised beds with plastic and water channels in-between.

Gaun took lots of photos to show her sister Yuan how chillies are grown here as it is a far more sophisticated method than back home. On Gaun’s farm the plants are just cultivated on flat earth and watered by hand.

The luxury accommodation for the workers. Probably to keep an eye on the crop in case hungry locals popped in help themselves at night.

The luxury accommodation for the workers. Probably to keep an eye on the crop in case hungry locals popped in help themselves at night. Kitchen at the end!

Walking back to the car we came across this travelling troupe set up on the corner playing to the local audience. I suppose a donation at the end covered the viewing. Almost a medieval type lifestyle travelling the roads, setting up in places to entertain the population.

The stage and seating area.

The stage and seating area.

I couldn't follow the plot!

I couldn’t follow the plot! Ladyboys aplenty. Any chance for men to dress as woman is enthusiastically embraced here.

Finally wherever you have people you have a market. Food is synonymous with any Thai activity and this was no different. We bought eggs, $1.30 for ten, and some veggies for dinner.

A typical local market stall.

A typical local market stall.

So for an Australian a simple trip down one street like this provides a couple of hours of interesting activities. Something quite different from anything I would experience in Canberra. It is simple, non-tourist outings like this that make my life here so rewarding.

If you enjoyed this story please leave a comment below. It is nice to know someone is reading!

Thanks for dropping by.