Covered or mentioned in this post:

Wat Mae Kaet, Hansa Golf, Route 1001, Rural Road 3012,


A quick break from Hong Hong posts and back to a Chiang Mai story. Here’s one that is a little off my usual themes.

I had read about Hansa Minigolf when searching for things to do out our way in San Sai, a Northern area of Chiang Mai. San Sai is not exactly the center for anything especially by way of things to do or see. A few cooking schools and adventure type activities but almost nothing to cater for the “drop-in” urge. The two spur of the moment attractions listed are Wat Mae Kaet, which we have already done – A R Rated Buddhist Temple HERE – and Hansa Minigolf. Hansa was given a great review on TA HERE and because it is only 15 minutes from our home we decided to have a look this morning.

The directions for getting there on Hansa’s own website HERE are pretty accurate. Just make sure you are on the right 1001 because there are two roads numbered 1001. Looking at the Google view below there is the main 1001, a double lane highway shown on the left and then there’s another 1001 that meanders its way across the map in the centre.

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The main 1001 on the left and the minor unmarked 1001 in the centre of the map above. Hansa Minigolf is on a side road off the 1001 called Rural Road 3012.

Rural Road 3012 is a lovely drive through small Moo Baans and rural scenery and if you don’t get lost it ends up joining the 118, which is the road to Chiang Mai shown in the map above. I have the photos ready for a blog post on this trip especially a hidden hillside Wat with superb views over Northern Chiang Mai, so look out for that sometime. A taste below:

A secret Wat with magnificent views over Chiang Mai.

A secret Wat with magnificent views over Chiang Mai.

Arriving at Hansa I was immediately impressed with how new and neat it all looked. So many places start out OK and then the maintenance factor just never kicks in and after a while it all looks pretty tired. I hope the owners keep it up.

Well maintained and shady garden.

Well maintained and shady garden.

The reception, cafe and games room is combined in a large cone roofed building on the left as you drive up. Parking around the back.

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The “clubhouse” in the background.

The 18 holes are all themed based around famous world landmarks, which adds a visual bit of fun. The course is laid out in attractive and shady gardens with several bench areas to take the weight off. It was a sunny morning in Chiang Mai so the shade at each hole was much appreciated.

Hole 1 is a Bangkok landmark called The Giant Swing.

Hole 1 is a Bangkok landmark called The Giant Swing.

A round of golf will cost you 100 THB or A$3.30 a person including a little scorecard and pencil. Make sure you open up the scorecard because on the back it tells you the rules, something I didn’t see until later in the “clubhouse”.

Each hole has a short explanation of what monument it is representing, which is well done. For example the hole above that Gaun is about to tackle is described as : The Giant Swing constructed in 1784, located in front of Wat Suthat temple Bangkok, is a religious structure of red teak pillars, once used for Brahmanic ceremonies. In 2005, the Giant Swing, together with Wat Suthat, was suggested as a future UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Descriptions of each hole.

Descriptions of each hole.

And this is the building itself.

And this is the building itself.

Gaun has never played golf before and my experience falls into much the same category. I must be about the only ex-banker in the world who never learnt to play golf. I don’t think you can get too serious about mini golf, although some people can get serious about anything. This is a concrete course so it doesn’t relate to real-life golf very well anyway. Very fast greens – throwing in some golf jargon.

Teeing off, is that right?, for the Arc de Triomphe.

Teeing off, is that right?, for the Arc de Triomphe. That little entrance to the “green”, or what Gaun calls a small soi or street, was a real bugger.

Wondering where I went wrong.

Wondering where I went wrong.

Gaun setting herself up for the pyramids.

Gaun setting herself up for the pyramids.

Nicely done. The Great Wall of China in the background.

Nicely done. The Great Wall of China in the background.

The Wall up close. Tricky curved shot to the green that Gaun is checking out.

The Wall up close. A tricky curved shot to the green that Gaun is checking out.

You can never have enough nudes on a golf course.

You can never have enough nudes on a golf course.

Another photo to show the lush gardens the course runs through.

Another photo to show the lush gardens the course runs through.

A nine iron for the Australian hole.

A nine iron for the Australian hole. Uluru has shrunk in the Thai wet season.

Dropping into Paris.

Dropping into Paris.

Another of those pesky small sois.

Another of those pesky small sois to get to the green.

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A seat in the shade. Just needs a beer and all would be well with life.

A hard 18 holes. Back in the clubhouse for a relax.

A hard 18 holes. Back in the clubhouse for a relax.

After my total annihilation by Gaun at the Buzz Lightyear Astro Blasters last week at Hong Kong Disneyland, read about it HERE, I am pleased to report that I carried the day by two shots. Male ego restored.

The only slight negative aspect to Hansa I will report is that they are very light on in the refreshment side of things. They do have a small menu that includes three pasta dishes, spring rolls and a toasted sandwich but not much else. Their drink offering was incredibly limited without even a range of soft drinks. After a hot round of golf the first thing you want is a long cool something and there wasn’t much choice to quench the thirst. A beer would have gone down REALLY well. The gardens and settling was nice enough just to go their for a drink or two if they had a better choice.

The cost for our round of golf, four iced teas and some spring rolls was $340 THB or A$12.00 so it ended up being both an enjoyable and cheap morning out in San Sai.

Thanks for reading.