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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW.
10 – 16 January, a big week of building walls all of which were completed by Thursday afternoon. In celebration of this event the crew has taken off to hunt rats in the hills outside Loei for a couple of days. It sort of reminds me of the tradespeople working close to the sea in Australia who would disappear whenever there was a good surf happening. For those reading who think that Thailand is always hot you should try Northern Isaan this time of year. Very cool. I tried to capture a moment but stuffed up the camera speed so it’s not a great photo. You can get the idea though. Local kids gathered around a fire to get warm early morning:
Not a parent in sight with flammable clothes/toys everywhere. Kids are left to just get on with life here. I am sure it has

Not a parent in sight with flammable clothes/toys everywhere. Kids are left to just get on with life here. I am sure it has disastrous consequences sometimes but I wonder if the end result is better than our western overprotection and supervision?

By the way the kids are laughing at my Thai number countdown, which I thought was pretty good but seeing their reaction maybe not 🙂 Back to the build the other major event in a very farang way was the hot water plumbing was finished and tested for pressure. Both hot and cold pipes leaked, which really emphasises the importance of insisting on this being done before the pipes are hidden away, in a cavity created by double AAC blocks in my case.
Here's something you don't see too often. A mixer tap.

Here’s something you don’t see too often. A mixer tap with hot water.

I have to say that for something so simple in theory the addition of a hot water system and associated pipework has been a real pain. Getting the pipes to fit the mixer taps, a few failures in the German push fitting system and annoying leaks had me wishing I had just opted for a simple wall instant system. My nightmare is that the hot water connections fail when we actually run it for real and we have to tear down walls to fix it. However if all goes well I will have the best showers in Si Bun Ruang, which in reality isn’t much of a boast to be making!
Ming has built us a frame for the 80 litre external hot water tank. He was worried about attaching it to the wall.

Ming has built us a frame for the 80 litre external hot water tank. He was worried about attaching it to the wall. You can see the white hot water pipe ready to attach to the tank once in place.

Week 11 is a bit along the same lines as Week 10. I don’t think anyone wants to follow a day by day photographic history of walls being built but I will throw a few in before skipping to the end result. Speaking of walls Ming, the builder, had one that was half built taken down because he wasn’t happy with it’s construction.
From lounge looking into the kitchen. Outside living area on the left.

From lounge looking into the kitchen. Outside living area on the left.

A huge amount of conduit is going in as the walls progress. The first fix of electrical was almost complete at the same time as the walls on the Thursday.
Heading down to the fuse box.

Heading down to the fuse box.

The fuse box ready to give life to the house one day.

The fuse box ready to give life to the house one day. Located in the walk-in pantry.

Outside living area on the left, front door and what will be a 3.6 meter double sliding door opening onto a paved patio area under a pergola.

Outside living area on the left not a car space which I am sure the Thais think it is, front door and what will be a 3.6 meter double sliding door opening onto a paved patio area under a pergola. Gaun rugged up.

From

From the back of the kitchen looking to the front.

Concrete reinforcing going above the windows/sliding doors. The rebar is then welded to the roof beams to give extra support.

Concrete reinforcing going above the windows/sliding doors. The rebar is then welded to the roof beams to give extra support.

We seem to be making almost daily trips to the nearest larger town Nong Bua Lamphu 30 km away, covered in my post HERE, for one thing or another. To test the plumbing we had to do a quick trip to get what we needed to set up the house water system so we could attach the pressure pump. The end result looks like this:
Not the final configuration.

Not the final configuration…..read on. That blue container on the right isn’t part of the system.

The bore is on the far left, a pipe from there is split with one line going to the house tank and the other will run into the garden and feed two taps on opposite sides of the land about halfway down. The black box on the left of the water tank is a filtration system specifically set up for bore water. More detailed in this photo: DSC_0196 The filter is at the back while the front box adds a water softener before depositing the result into the tank. A pressure pump sits on the other side of the tank and supplies the house only, not garden. I followed the instructions supplied with the filter for this configuration and it doesn’t work!

Building in Thailand eBook

When my wife and I bought some land in Isaan, which is a region in the north east of Thailand, and then started to build our house I started to record the daily events of construction life. For twenty six weeks I wrote a weekly blog update about all the aspects of the build and included as much detail as possible for others who might be thinking of going down the same path. I was surprised by the number of readers I attracted as a result of writing on this subject, many of whom followed the entire build from beginning to end. 

Based on this continued interest I thought I would revisit my original words and bring them all together under the one heading in the form of an eBook. Included in this process has been some extensive updating and expansion of many of the original posts and the addition of the many COMMENTS, which are designed to expand your knowledge and save you time or money or both!

Read more HERE and find out how to obtain the eBook.

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical.

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.