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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW.


17 – 23 January, a slow week so this will be a short post. The rat hunt I told you about in Week 11 HERE, which robbed the build of workers, ended on Sunday taking three days rather than the expected two. Only a moderate result in terms of rats collected in case you were interested, which is good news for the rats!

Ming had wanted a particular guy to work on the render and, in typical Thai multi-skilling, also on the tiling once we get to that stage. He is supposed to be very good but more expensive. Remember that I have a fixed price labour contract with Ming the builder. A deal must have been reached because he turned up Monday and started what would end up being a full week’s work laying out the levels for render everywhere where there is a corner in the building both inside and out.

Each corner measured and laid out in mortar to ensure the correct coverage of the walls.

Each corner measured and laid out in mortar to ensure the correct coverage of the walls and sharp corners.

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This is on what will be a sliding door frame. Done on the left. To do on the right. Plumb line set out.

These little ridges must be there to help get the depth.

These little ridges must be there to help get the depth.

The whole lounge room walls done like this but not elsewhere. I don't know why.

The whole lounge room walls done like this but not elsewhere. I don’t know why.

I was surprised at the amount of render being applied. I was under the impression that one of the benefits of the AAC blocks is that because the surface is pretty smooth, in comparison say to the rough concrete blocks or the red bricks so loved by Thais, that a skim coat of render was all that would be required. Not so evidently. Can’t say I am particularly bothered. The render is cheap and the more bulk to the walls of the house the better from both an insulation perspective and sound reduction.

With not much exciting happening inside we have continued work on the garden by planted up the South and Western side of the house with shrubs that will eventually grow high enough to cut out the setting sun from the windows at the bedroom end of the house and also the outside dining area at the very end of the day.

These will quickly provide shade to the North and West of the house. 150 THB each or A$5.50.

These will quickly provide shade to the South and West of the house. 150 THB each or A$5.50.

We also bought 1,000 hedging plants to plant around the perimeter of the land to hide the fence and also provide security in the longer term. A A$100.00 investment.

1,000 small plants waiting for a home.

1,000 small plants waiting for a home.

Gaun in her element.

Gaun in her element.

Big things grow from small beginnings.

Big things grow from small beginnings or I hope so in this case anyway.

120 meters of hedging planted up so far.

120 meters of hedging planted up so far. You can see why I am keen the hide the fence.

Me adding the necessary chicken wire to the fence to keep out both chickens and dogs.

Me adding the necessary chicken wire to the fence to keep out both chickens and dogs. A 30 meter roll costing 440 THB at Global House. I’m enjoying doing something rather than just watch others work, although that’s fun too!

A trip to Global also gave us our kitchen drinking water filter, a rather fancy 5 stage model that will give us cleaner water than rainwater! We got the Camarcio RO002 model. It looks something like this RO003 version and will sit under the sink with an access tap on the benchtop.

Bought from Global 6,000 THB.

Bought from Global 6,000 THB.

On Thursday enough pre-work had been done to allow the full rendering team to turn up and start working.

Starting out.

Starting out. Ming plus one. Ming on the left and one of his regular workers called Joy on the right. He is actually a delightful guy too matching his name. A good solid worker.

Ming and two others rendering, one guy keeping them supplied with cement and the main guy still working on levels elsewhere.

Two rendering, Ming a sometimes helper, one guy keeping them supplied with cement and the main guy still working on levels elsewhere. Dog an observer only. Our bedroom door on the left, pantry in the middle and Peng’s/guest bedroom door on the right.

Thanks for reading.

The most comprehensive reference manual on building a house in Thailand. An e-book of 120,000 words arranged in a number of sections including the initial planning stages, a daily report on the construction process, later updates after we move in, a few summaries and a section on more general background topics such as land titles, Usufruct contracts, utility expenses and the daily cost of my building project.

So, what will you find here?

Firstly, I am a retired government employee not a builder so you won’t find a very specific how-to building book full of technical details. However, what you have bought is a very detailed 884-page coverage of how an enthusiastic amateur like me survived the Thai building challenges and ended up with a wonderful home that I still find hard to believe I have achieved.

Although the house we built is unique to us and may not be anything like the style of dwelling you plan to build, you will find many of the processes, frustrations and hints I share very relevant to almost any domestic construction project in Thailand. Topics covered such as creating a cool house, planning and design tips and specific topics like septic and water solutions are mostly likely generic to your situation, or parts of them will be, so will be a useful addition to your research material.

I have tried to make the book a good read and not just a dry list of dos and don’ts. It is written in a casual style as though I was chatting with you and I hope that makes it more engaging. In each chapter you will live every individual day of the build with us plus some of other events and activities and share our excitements and frustrations. Even if you aren’t about to build in Thailand, I believe the book includes enough interesting material of one farang’s story to hold your attention.

Find out how to obtain the e-book HERE and lots more information including a free sample chapter HERE

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical. Mike

Undoubtedly, we would not have the quality home we now have without the book, we had no idea even where to start until we found Building in Thailand eBook. We did manage to avoid most of the traps that we could have fallen into, we are extremally thankful for the authors attention to detail and common-sense approach. Chris

I have had the good fortune to have used the first edition as part of Yuri and my plans to build our home here in Surin.  To say it is a good reference book is an understatement.  The practical advice and your self deprecating style make it a great read.  The anecdotes and asides all add to its appeal as both a “how to manual” and a fascinating insight into what lies ahead for people like me who have only just commenced a similar journey. Far better armed for what’s to be encountered. Greg

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.