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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW.
31 January – 6 February, a week of progress. With a full crew of nine people now working on the house since the Thursday of Week 13, which I wrote about HERE, things really pushed ahead this week. Day 92 – A big effort after yet more render was ordered and delivered. Another 70 bags. These walls would stand up by themselves even without the AAC blocks! I measured them on completion and they are 25 cm thick. They look almost medieval in appearance. Wonderful. The kitchen area was finally finished as well as the outside living space.
Kitchen now rendered.

Kitchen now rendered.

Outside living area finished. A friend has suggested we try making that window from the kitchen into a servery for drinks etc, something I will follow up with the window manufacturers come the time.

Outside living area finished. A friend has suggested we try making that window from the kitchen into a servery for drinks etc, something I will follow up with the window manufacturers come the time.

Meanwhile we headed yet again to Nong Bua Lamphu for more electrical items. This is a drip feed process with things being asked for by the electrical guys on a day by day basis, something I am getting a little tired of.
Electrical wiring going in everywhere.

Electrical wiring going in everywhere.

The fuse box, which brings cries of amazement from visitors. Thai house with a handful of lights and powerpoints look nothing like this.

The fuse box, which brings cries of amazement from visitors. Thai houses with a handful of lights and powerpoints look nothing like this.

A thoughtful ladder added to access the roof via the pantry and even a lighting point, neither things I had mentioned or even included in my list of things to be done. Full marks.

Thoughtfully a ladder has been added to the roof space to help access it via the pantry and even a wire run for a lighting outlet top centre, neither things I had mentioned or even included in my list of things to be done. Full marks to the team.

From front door looking towards the kitchen/family area.

From the front door looking towards the kitchen/family area.

Day 93 – Back to Nong Bua Lamphu this time to order the ceiling. We had tried to do this previously but the very knowledgeable guy we meet there the first time had a few days off. I have never seen a suspended ceiling in a domestic situation so had no idea of what was involved other than Gyprock sheeting. At Global House they ran the size through a computer program and it came back with the qualities of everything we needed plus some probably. Delivery the next day at a cost of 558 THB – a per km rate. Back at the house the delivery of outside tiling arrived a few days before expected. We had ordered 100 m2 from a local business in Nong Bua at a cost of 122 THB per m2, covered in Week 13. When they unpacked the pallet the centre boxes were damp and had been infested with small white ants, the combination of which had stained 33 boxes of tiles. No questions asked, they loaded those back on the truck and said they would deliver replacements in the next week.
The tiles for outside.

The tiles for outside in a light tan with a slight copper coloured fleck.

After long consideration I decided not to go the Thai way of laying the smoothest, shiniest and most slippery tiles outside, designed to cause the maximum damage in the wet season, but to go for a tile that had a rough sand finish with plenty of grip! We farang are strange creatures sometimes.

Building in Thailand eBook

When my wife and I bought some land in Isaan, which is a region in the north east of Thailand, and then started to build our house I started to record the daily events of construction life. For twenty six weeks I wrote a weekly blog update about all the aspects of the build and included as much detail as possible for others who might be thinking of going down the same path. I was surprised by the number of readers I attracted as a result of writing on this subject, many of whom followed the entire build from beginning to end. 

Based on this continued interest I thought I would revisit my original words and bring them all together under the one heading in the form of an eBook. Included in this process has been some extensive updating and expansion of many of the original posts and the addition of the many COMMENTS, which are designed to expand your knowledge and save you time or money or both!

Read more HERE and find out how to obtain the eBook.

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical.

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.