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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW.


31 January – 6 February, a week of progress. With a full crew of nine people now working on the house since the Thursday of Week 13, which I wrote about HERE, things really pushed ahead this week.

Day 92 – A big effort after yet more render was ordered and delivered. Another 70 bags. These walls would stand up by themselves even without the AAC blocks! I measured them on completion and they are 25 cm thick. They look almost medieval in appearance. Wonderful. The kitchen area was finally finished as well as the outside living space.

Kitchen now rendered.

Kitchen now rendered.

Outside living area finished. A friend has suggested we try making that window from the kitchen into a servery for drinks etc, something I will follow up with the window manufacturers come the time.

Outside living area finished. A friend has suggested we try making that window from the kitchen into a servery for drinks etc, something I will follow up with the window manufacturers come the time.

Meanwhile we headed yet again to Nong Bua Lamphu for more electrical items. This is a drip feed process with things being asked for by the electrical guys on a day by day basis, something I am getting a little tired of.

Electrical wiring going in everywhere.

Electrical wiring going in everywhere.

The fuse box, which brings cries of amazement from visitors. Thai house with a handful of lights and powerpoints look nothing like this.

The fuse box, which brings cries of amazement from visitors. Thai houses with a handful of lights and powerpoints look nothing like this.

A thoughtful ladder added to access the roof via the pantry and even a lighting point, neither things I had mentioned or even included in my list of things to be done. Full marks.

Thoughtfully a ladder has been added to the roof space to help access it via the pantry and even a wire run for a lighting outlet top centre, neither things I had mentioned or even included in my list of things to be done. Full marks to the team.

From front door looking towards the kitchen/family area.

From the front door looking towards the kitchen/family area.

Day 93 – Back to Nong Bua Lamphu this time to order the ceiling. We had tried to do this previously but the very knowledgeable guy we meet there the first time had a few days off. I have never seen a suspended ceiling in a domestic situation so had no idea of what was involved other than Gyprock sheeting. At Global House they ran the size through a computer program and it came back with the qualities of everything we needed plus some probably. Delivery the next day at a cost of 558 THB – a per km rate.

Back at the house the delivery of outside tiling arrived a few days before expected. We had ordered 100 m2 from a local business in Nong Bua at a cost of 122 THB per m2, covered in Week 13. When they unpacked the pallet the centre boxes were damp and had been infested with small white ants, the combination of which had stained 33 boxes of tiles. No questions asked, they loaded those back on the truck and said they would deliver replacements in the next week.

The tiles for outside.

The tiles for outside in a light tan with a slight copper coloured fleck.

After long consideration I decided not to go the Thai way of laying the smoothest, shiniest and most slippery tiles outside, designed to cause the maximum damage in the wet season, but to go for a tile that had a rough sand finish with plenty of grip! We farang are strange creatures sometimes.

The most comprehensive reference manual on building a house in Thailand. An e-book of 120,000 words arranged in a number of sections including the initial planning stages, a daily report on the construction process, later updates after we move in, a few summaries and a section on more general background topics such as land titles, Usufruct contracts, utility expenses and the daily cost of my building project.

So, what will you find here?

Firstly, I am a retired government employee not a builder so you won’t find a very specific how-to building book full of technical details. However, what you have bought is a very detailed 884-page coverage of how an enthusiastic amateur like me survived the Thai building challenges and ended up with a wonderful home that I still find hard to believe I have achieved.

Although the house we built is unique to us and may not be anything like the style of dwelling you plan to build, you will find many of the processes, frustrations and hints I share very relevant to almost any domestic construction project in Thailand. Topics covered such as creating a cool house, planning and design tips and specific topics like septic and water solutions are mostly likely generic to your situation, or parts of them will be, so will be a useful addition to your research material.

I have tried to make the book a good read and not just a dry list of dos and don’ts. It is written in a casual style as though I was chatting with you and I hope that makes it more engaging. In each chapter you will live every individual day of the build with us plus some of other events and activities and share our excitements and frustrations. Even if you aren’t about to build in Thailand, I believe the book includes enough interesting material of one farang’s story to hold your attention.

Find out how to obtain the e-book HERE and lots more information including a free sample chapter HERE

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical. Mike

Undoubtedly, we would not have the quality home we now have without the book, we had no idea even where to start until we found Building in Thailand eBook. We did manage to avoid most of the traps that we could have fallen into, we are extremally thankful for the authors attention to detail and common-sense approach. Chris

I have had the good fortune to have used the first edition as part of Yuri and my plans to build our home here in Surin.  To say it is a good reference book is an understatement.  The practical advice and your self deprecating style make it a great read.  The anecdotes and asides all add to its appeal as both a “how to manual” and a fascinating insight into what lies ahead for people like me who have only just commenced a similar journey. Far better armed for what’s to be encountered. Greg

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.