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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW.
7 – 13 February, a slower week after the big effort last week, which you can read about HERE, but steady progress made. It is at this point in the build, where the house is starting to look more like something that could be lived in, that one wishes for a fast forward button and we could just finish everything today! One of the more pleasurable aspects of progress is the winding down of the pure construction and a move to the decoration and fit out stage. Day 99 – We had been drip-feeding the team bags of render so that for once we ended up without an excess of materials. The FINAL five bags of render was bought locally and dropped off at the site and soon after the front of the house was completed meaning the whole inside and out was finished. Yay. I wrote last week how fed up I was of concrete and nothing has changed that opinion this week.
The render finally finished. A happy moment.

The render finally finished. A happy moment.

Inside all the ceilings were completed and the plastering of joints etc done. Anti-moisture Gyproc was bought for the ensuites, more expensive at 222 THB a sheet rather than the 143 THB for the regular version, but with only 12 m2 to cover a good investment for a very small additional cost. These sheets are green in colour or you can go the next step up and buy the ones with a silver backing. Day 100 – With the ceiling finished the team on site dropped to Ming and Joy, one of his permanents. The other regular, Jack, had hurt his knee and was out of action for a couple of days. The attention turned to outside and building the framework that would form the soffit or eaves. This was being constructed out of some heavy duty looking steel beams, far more than I would have thought necessary, but it was a standard detailed in the plans. So we were once again back to steel and welding, something we hadn’t seen since the roof was finished. At the end of the day Tam, the electrician plus a few other occupations, dropped in. He had asked me the previous day what I was doing to control the water flow into the water tank from the bore. As far as I was concerned we just got a bigger version of the float valve I put on the family’s water supply from the Moo Baan source. Tam pointed me towards an electronic version which he said was what was needed for a submersible pump and offered to buy one for me the next day being his day off. This is what he came up with:
Who would have thought?

Who would have thought?

This was not an area I researched so I am going with the flow, so to speak, on this recommendation. We have a 1 1/2 pipe from bore to tank and I haven’t seen a float valve that size but maybe they are around. Tam is pretty switched on, I must stop this, and in this case I am trusting his advice. At 955 THB it wasn’t a great expense. Day 101 – Ming and Joy continued to work on the soffit frame. In the two outside areas, the lounge at the front and the dining area on the right of the house, I had requested a more fancy design than just having the ceiling boards run from the facia to the walls. The frame of the soffit had to match that, which involved more steel and man hours. The result ended up being a piece of design in itself.
The soffit frame in the outside lounge area.

The soffit frame in the outside lounge area.

Some of the detail that went into building this.

Some of the detail that went into building this.

Being Ming not only is the frame secured to the wall it is also double welded on the edges and at the suspended frame points.

Being Ming not only is the frame secured to the wall it is also double welded on the edges and at the suspended frame points.

All welding joints being covered with anti-corrosion paint.

All welding joints being covered with anti-corrosion paint.

We headed to Global House and bought 3 tubs of primer paint and tiles for the ensuite walls. The tiler and his offsider were due on the site the next day as they had just finished another job and were looking for work. At Global I also bought 3 litres of tinted paint to test the colour I thought would work for the exterior walls.

Building in Thailand eBook

When my wife and I bought some land in Isaan, which is a region in the north east of Thailand, and then started to build our house I started to record the daily events of construction life. For twenty six weeks I wrote a weekly blog update about all the aspects of the build and included as much detail as possible for others who might be thinking of going down the same path. I was surprised by the number of readers I attracted as a result of writing on this subject, many of whom followed the entire build from beginning to end. 

Based on this continued interest I thought I would revisit my original words and bring them all together under the one heading in the form of an eBook. Included in this process has been some extensive updating and expansion of many of the original posts and the addition of the many COMMENTS, which are designed to expand your knowledge and save you time or money or both!

Read more HERE and find out how to obtain the eBook.

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical.

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.