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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW.
13 – 19 December 2014, this was the week that the shape of our house became a reality with both the roof structure and concrete slab completed. Day 43 Saturday, the concrete slab team of four guys turned up first thing and started the preparation work to get the ground levelled and the sand down ready to lay out the rebar for the slab.
The preparation work starting.

The preparation work starting.

Meanwhile Ming’s three workers continued to build the roof. It was a very pleasing sight to see eight people working on the site rather than Ming + one, which we got down to at one stage. We headed to Nong Bua Lamphu and Thai Watsadu to pick up a couple of rolls of black plastic to lay on top of the sand and under the rebar as a vapor barrier and to slow concrete drying period.
Levelled.

Levelled and black plastic being laid out. All plumbing complete including P-Traps!

Ming is mostly pretty on top of his job. Here he has incorporated the electrical conduit to bring electricity into the house under the slab. He wants to bring power from the roadside pole to the house underground, which shows an unusual sensitivity for the aesthetics of the build for a Thai.
Conduit in place.

Conduit in place.

Formwork starting to be put in place. One meter surround to the house outside the walls.

Slab formwork starting to be put up. A one meter surround to the house outside the walls. 260 m2 of concrete.

By the end of the day the slab team were starting to lay out the rebar, which was to be constructed on site, a task I was pleased not to have to do. We decided do this as the off-the-shelf versions were made from thin rebar and everything else in the build has been of quality so why stop now? The extra labour costs would be covered by Ming and he didn’t have any problems in going down this route. Day 44 Sunday, gotta love the 7 day a week build. The roof guys started to put up the central supporting beam that will form the ridge to the roof.
Struggling to make sure the beam is vertical. Everything is checked on this build.

Struggling to make sure the beam is vertical while Ming welds. Everything is checked on this build.

Workers above and below.

Workers above and below.

A separate area being built next to the bore for water tank, filter and pump.

A separate area being built at the back of the land next to the bore for water tank, filter and pump.

Each join done individually. Not the most interesting job.

Each join done individually. Not the most interesting job.

Tying rebar together. All done in good spirits, which is something they consume in amazing quantities at the end of the day!

Tying rebar together. All done in good spirits, which is something they also consume in amazing quantities at the end of the day!

Here you can see the center beam in place and the start of the roof structure happening.

Here you can see the center beam in place and the start of the roof structure happening.

Day 45 Monday, the preparation for the slab was finished today and the concrete pour booked for the morning. Ming and team made great progress on one half of the roof.
Starts to look like a roof.

Starts to look like a roof.

From the road.

From the road.

Meanwhile we hit the road to Udon Thani with the mission to find the alternative supplier of Windsor windows as I had been told through udonmap.com, a local forum, that they were a cheaper alternative to EK Decorate, the better known of the two suppliers in Udon. This one is located on Thong Yai road with Bangkok Hospital on your left. The shop is about .5km on your right shortly after it becomes a lot narrower. You’ll see a large construction material yard when you arrive but it is easy to miss. Just drive in and ask for Khun Yok. Nothing like EK. No fancy displays but the people are really friendly and helpful and the head lady speaks pretty good English, something missing at EK Decorate. I am still struggling with selecting the right combination of windows as I wrote about HERE. This second Windsor supplier came in with the best quote to date by quite a margin. However the best Windsor can do for a double glazing profile is a 5/6/5, that is 5 mm glass, 6 mm spacer and 5 mm glass, which is less than the one I wanted being 6/9/5. The difference in the glass size is supposed to help with noise reduction.

Building in Thailand eBook

When my wife and I bought some land in Isaan, which is a region in the north east of Thailand, and then started to build our house I started to record the daily events of construction life. For twenty six weeks I wrote a weekly blog update about all the aspects of the build and included as much detail as possible for others who might be thinking of going down the same path. I was surprised by the number of readers I attracted as a result of writing on this subject, many of whom followed the entire build from beginning to end. 

Based on this continued interest I thought I would revisit my original words and bring them all together under the one heading in the form of an eBook. Included in this process has been some extensive updating and expansion of many of the original posts and the addition of the many COMMENTS, which are designed to expand your knowledge and save you time or money or both!

Read more HERE and find out how to obtain the eBook.

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical.

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.