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PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS ONLY AN EXTRACT OF WHAT YOU WILL READ IN FULL IN MY EBOOK ‘BUILDING A HOUSE IN THAILAND’ DETAILS OF WHICH YOU WILL FIND BELOW. Update 22 July 2016 If you look at the comments below you will find a couple that are very anti-DeKu. I have made it very clear in my blog that I do not support DeKu or have anything to do with them other than buy some of their products fifteen months ago. If I was a DeKu stooge I would remove the comments! My decision to go with this company was a personal one based on the choices available to me IN ISAAN. There is no use telling me about better companies in Pattaya or anywhere else that are either outside my budget or couldn’t provide an installation service. What I write about in this blog is what I personally experienced building a house in Isaan. DeKu were part of that process so I share MY observations of how that worked for me. Others may find the DeKu product to be rubbish but I have been using their windows and doors for fifteen months now they still look great and work well, with a couple of reservations that I cover in the blog. You are obviously not going to just take my words as the sole reason to add DeKu to your new home inclusion list and I would recommend a psychological evaluation if you did 🙂 Explore the options and choose the best that works for you. If you have some sensible feedback on alternatives then leave a comment so that others can check them out. Finding reliable information is one of the challenges to building here.
With all the doors and windows installed I thought it was an appropriate time to review the whole process and give you my conclusions on DeKu as a company to deal with and their product. I have added this as a separate post because I know of several people following the blog who have a particular interest in this subject. I will start the post by including the information I shared in Week 18 HERE when we visited the DeKu showroom and factory in Pattaya so that all the relevant details are in the one area. On Tuesday, build day 122, Gaun and I left early for Udon Thani airport to catch our flight to Bangkok for the reasons I wrote about last week HERE. My tasks at the Australian embassy quickly completed we caught a taxi to Pattaya and moved an appointment to meet Peter, the CEO to DeKu German Windows, from the previously arranged Wednesday morning to that afternoon. I wrote about our time in Pattaya, excluding the DeKu visit, HERE. The DeKu showroom is super easy to find. Turning left at the freeway T junction at Pattaya, it is in the first group of office buildings on the left hand side.
The DeKu showroom.

The DeKu showroom.

A decent set-up inside.

A decent set-up inside.

All the different window/door profiles.

All the different window/door profiles.

Peter met us there and we finalised the order. The windows/doors should be constructed within two weeks and installation sometime in the third, which is a pretty good outcome if it happens. A 20th of March window install completion is what I am planning for and will report how close we get. For those of you who have been through the building process you might remember how you suddenly have a real house once the place is sealed from the outside. Until then it is like a big open sala. I had also requested to see DeKu’s factory just to get a better idea of the type of operation they were running. To this point everything had been done via the internet and I didn’t even know whether there was a company producing windows at the other end. As I was going to be handing over 200,000 THB I wanted to confirm that this was a legitimate business. I am pleased to say that DeKu do look as though they build windows and doors, which is good news for my build!
Peter and his small but clean, organised factory.

Peter and his small but clean, organised factory.

Some windows being constructed.

Some windows being constructed.

DSC_0281 The product itself looked and felt very solid and I was happy with the double glazing glass 6-9-5 profile, which is ordered in and not built by DeKu. 6mm green tinted, 9mm space and 5mm plain glass, a total thickness of 20mm. I was less impressed with my first look at the insect screens which felt a bit flimsy and didn’t slide as smoothly as I would have liked. I am basing this on my Australian experience, where of course all windows and doors have them fitted and mostly use small wheels at the bottom to provide effortless opening. I will reserve judgement until the DeKu ones are installed.
 Back to the latest news. When I left DeKu it was on the understanding that the windows would be ready in a two weeks and installation done in the third as I mentioned above. In my mind I was was thinking later rather than earlier so it came as a shock when I got an email from Peter on Sunday the 15th, just over two weeks from when we paid the deposit, that his truck was leaving Pattaya that night and his team would be on site the next morning. It was one of the high points of the build. In today’s world where people over-promise and under-deliver it was quite special to have the promise become a reality. True to his word the truck turned up early the next morning having driven the 12 hours from Pattaya with a installation team of three. In Australia the workers would have to have a day off to recover but here the guys got straight into unloading as the truck was heading back South as soon as the windows were off.
Straight into action after a 12 hour drive.

Straight into action after a 12 hour drive.

Some of the windows sitting in the lounge room plus all the living away from home gear for the installation team.

Some of the windows sitting in the lounge room plus all the living away from home gear for the installation team.

The truck empty it headed off for the return 12 hour trip, travelling somewhat lighter this time. Thanks for reading.

Building in Thailand eBook

When my wife and I bought some land in Isaan, which is a region in the north east of Thailand, and then started to build our house I started to record the daily events of construction life. For twenty six weeks I wrote a weekly blog update about all the aspects of the build and included as much detail as possible for others who might be thinking of going down the same path. I was surprised by the number of readers I attracted as a result of writing on this subject, many of whom followed the entire build from beginning to end. 

Based on this continued interest I thought I would revisit my original words and bring them all together under the one heading in the form of an eBook. Included in this process has been some extensive updating and expansion of many of the original posts and the addition of the many COMMENTS, which are designed to expand your knowledge and save you time or money or both!

Read more HERE and find out how to obtain the eBook.

I am loving your book – just on my second read at the moment, to make sure that I didn’t miss anything first time around (which actually it turns out I did!).  

Just a note of thanks at this point ……. I am a fairly methodical sort of bloke, but there are many issues which your book highlights which I just wouldn’t have thought about – or if I had, I may well have assumed they were “standard” building practice [U-bends, drain positioning, barge-board alignment] – if it hadn’t been for your excellent descriptions!!  I will probably still “miss” something – that’s the nature of building/design – but thanks to you, it shouldn’t be anything too mission-critical.

The income from my eBook pays for the upkeep of this blog, which is otherwise commercially free unlike so many others.